Recent Changes

Wednesday, February 25

  1. page New Topic edited ... Cross-Platform Integration Tools As the number of online tools and services grows continually…
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    Cross-Platform Integration Tools
    As the number of online tools and services grows continually, services that enable integration and dialogue between these tools become increasingly important. For instance, LTI (Learning Tools Interoperability): "the principal concept of LTI is to establish a standard way of integrating rich learning applications (often remotely hosted and provided through third-party services) with platforms like learning management systems, portals, or other educational environments" (see http://www.imsglobal.org/toolsinteroperability2.cfm ). Another example is the excellent IFTTT ('If This Then That' - https://ifttt.com/) which enables users to create powerful connections between online tools and services by choosing from a number of existing 'recipes' or by creating their own. enda.donlon Feb 13, 2015 We need to VLE/LMS to do less and instead act as a jumping off point - best not to develop bloated systems - the platform may really just be for administrators and teachers to manage and track activity and allow you to access innovative tools from elsewhere (we have done some experiments with Moodle and Piazza for discussion) brian.mulligan Feb 17, 2015 In addition to Brian's earlier comment where LIT allows the use of the "best of breed " tools instead of trying to get the LMS to do everything LTI will also allow inter institutional collaboration when it comes to program delivery - we already have examples of that in DCU mark.glynn Feb 23, 2015
    Digital Animation and Coding
    Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as it facilitates the integration of all four skills of language learning: reading, writing, speaking and listening; creating a more authentic meaningful language-learning environment for students. There are many animation applications (web and mobile) available to language teachers such as Go Animate, PowToons, Scratch, Puppet Pals, etc. rnidhubhda Feb 12, 2015 We use animation and coding software with our students across a range of programmes at undergrad and postgrad in order that they can in turn design creative learning environments for their students at first and second level. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree this is an area that offers opportunity to expand a number of literacy types (language, visual, digital amongst them), and can encourage creative collaboration and expression at all levels of education.NSweeney Feb 15, 2015 Creative, constructionist apps and software that enable learners to design, develop, adapt and, or share multimedia artefacts and products. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    Combined with Existing Topics in RQ1
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  2. page New Topic edited ... Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as…
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    Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as it facilitates the integration of all four skills of language learning: reading, writing, speaking and listening; creating a more authentic meaningful language-learning environment for students. There are many animation applications (web and mobile) available to language teachers such as Go Animate, PowToons, Scratch, Puppet Pals, etc. rnidhubhda Feb 12, 2015 We use animation and coding software with our students across a range of programmes at undergrad and postgrad in order that they can in turn design creative learning environments for their students at first and second level. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree this is an area that offers opportunity to expand a number of literacy types (language, visual, digital amongst them), and can encourage creative collaboration and expression at all levels of education.NSweeney Feb 15, 2015 Creative, constructionist apps and software that enable learners to design, develop, adapt and, or share multimedia artefacts and products. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    Combined with Existing Topics in RQ1
    [Editor's note -- let's have an editor's meeting on this topic -- literacy and identity may be related, but they are also very distinct topics]
    Learning Badges - Mozilla.
    As verifiable alternative credentials that employers can drill into to see more detail, they could attract learners away from higher educational institutions. They may be valuable to higher educational institutions by (i) allowing students to show more detail of their academic achievements, (ii) facilitate a move towards competency or mastery learning, (iii) facilitate the construction of shared infrastructure for easing recognition of prior learning (RPL/APL). brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Agree - badges have become one of the monetisation strategies of MOOCs; mainstream HE can learn and adapt the concept for flexible frameworks such as CPD. b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015 ken.brown Feb 14, 2015 agree the utilisation of accredited badges But aren't badges and microcredits one of the current list of topics already (I think this is a list for what might need to be added) Gearoid.OSuilleabhain Feb 15, 2015 Gearóid is correct - this is already listed brian.mulligan Feb 17, 2015 [Editor's Note: This topic already exists in RQ1 under Badges/Micro-credits and your comments will be added there.]
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    Experience API
    I'm not sure if this isn't dealt with already but Experience API (aka, or originally, Tin Can) is a new software specification that takes up where SCORM leaves off and allows, inter alia, for recording and tracking of all kinds of learning experience and evidence within, and tellingly, beyond the traditional LMS type environment. It's right here right now but not everyone is aware of it (and fewer of us are actually using it yet): AgreedAlison.Egan Feb 16, 2015 [Editor's Note: Thanks for sharing! We do not feature products as technology topics in the Horizon Project.]
    Virtualisation
    I'm
    VirtualisationI'm not sure
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    21, 2015
    [Editor's Note: Great Points!]
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  3. page New Topic edited ... Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as…
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    Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as it facilitates the integration of all four skills of language learning: reading, writing, speaking and listening; creating a more authentic meaningful language-learning environment for students. There are many animation applications (web and mobile) available to language teachers such as Go Animate, PowToons, Scratch, Puppet Pals, etc. rnidhubhda Feb 12, 2015 We use animation and coding software with our students across a range of programmes at undergrad and postgrad in order that they can in turn design creative learning environments for their students at first and second level. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree this is an area that offers opportunity to expand a number of literacy types (language, visual, digital amongst them), and can encourage creative collaboration and expression at all levels of education.NSweeney Feb 15, 2015 Creative, constructionist apps and software that enable learners to design, develop, adapt and, or share multimedia artefacts and products. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    Combined with Existing Topics in RQ1
    Digital Literacies
    paul.gormley Feb 22, 2015 This suggestion is closely related to the topic 'Digital Identity' Digital identity in higher education is very much related to digital literacy of both students and teachers. For example, Barnett and Coate (2005) suggest being digital in the C21 higher education context is influenced by knowledge, skills/actions and being (i.e. a sense of 'self' which manifests itself in one's digital identity). In other words the definition of digital identity above does not explicitly capture captures the ability of the person to apply digital knowledge, skills, tools and attributes (although this may be covered by the 'ontological taxonomy' wording) Learning design approaches need to embed contextualised digital literacies into the curriculum. At present, there is a lot of noise about digital literacies with few practical examples of how these can be operationalised. However, with the emergence of digital literacy frameworks (e.g. Open University, JISC/Beetham, DigEULit) we are now seeing useful case studies emerging. As many of these frameworks are based on constructive alignment models, the inclusion of authentic learning opportunities can be easily incorporated into the curriculum (especially into the professional curriculum that has a work place element to the learning programme). Much of the research in this area recommend this approach (and stresses a move away from generic ICT models like the ECDL). Incorporating these tools and practices into the curriculum acknowledge the importance of digital lteracies as generic transferable comptencies (graduate attributes) to institutions, academics and students. It has to be engineered - it won't happen by osmosis. Digital literacies and identify can be closely associated with students' construction of a lifelong learning digital footprint (or portfolio) which facilitates the aggregation of digital artefacts, processes and outputs alongside opportunities to reflect on student's personal, academic and professional journey. This portfolio can be exposed and targeted at a ranges of stakeholder audiences (including prospective employers). [Editor's Note: Fantastic points! We will merge this with the existing definition in RQ1 for Digital Identity]

    [Editor's note -- let's have an editor's meeting on this topic -- literacy and identity may be related, but they are also very distinct topics]
    Learning Badges - Mozilla.
    As verifiable alternative credentials that employers can drill into to see more detail, they could attract learners away from higher educational institutions. They may be valuable to higher educational institutions by (i) allowing students to show more detail of their academic achievements, (ii) facilitate a move towards competency or mastery learning, (iii) facilitate the construction of shared infrastructure for easing recognition of prior learning (RPL/APL). brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Agree - badges have become one of the monetisation strategies of MOOCs; mainstream HE can learn and adapt the concept for flexible frameworks such as CPD. b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015 ken.brown Feb 14, 2015 agree the utilisation of accredited badges But aren't badges and microcredits one of the current list of topics already (I think this is a list for what might need to be added) Gearoid.OSuilleabhain Feb 15, 2015 Gearóid is correct - this is already listed brian.mulligan Feb 17, 2015 [Editor's Note: This topic already exists in RQ1 under Badges/Micro-credits and your comments will be added there.]
    Virtualisation
    I'm not sure if this is a topic in its own right, or connected to topics such as BYOD and/or single sign on. For many if not all disciplines, the ability of students to access specialist/discipline-specific software from their own laptop has to be a central plank of HEI digital strategy. BYOD needs to be a 'negotiated' approach, where colleges can advise students about the most appropriate devices to own, relevant to their particular programme of study. jimdevine Feb 10, 2015 deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Description, rationale and discussion.... Virtualisation and Cloud go together: Cloud Computing is already a topic? Phelim.Murnion Feb 18, 2015 The use of virtualisation as infrastructure and also potentially as a teaching methodology, particularly in STEM education. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015 [Editor's Note: Great Points! This will be merged with existing RQ1 Topic: Cloud Computing]

    Other Interesting Points
    Digital Literacies
    paul.gormley Feb 22, 2015 This suggestion is closely related to the topic 'Digital Identity' Digital identity in higher education is very much related to digital literacy of both students and teachers. For example, Barnett and Coate (2005) suggest being digital in the C21 higher education context is influenced by knowledge, skills/actions and being (i.e. a sense of 'self' which manifests itself in one's digital identity). In other words the definition of digital identity above does not explicitly capture captures the ability of the person to apply digital knowledge, skills, tools and attributes (although this may be covered by the 'ontological taxonomy' wording) Learning design approaches need to embed contextualised digital literacies into the curriculum. At present, there is a lot of noise about digital literacies with few practical examples of how these can be operationalised. However, with the emergence of digital literacy frameworks (e.g. Open University, JISC/Beetham, DigEULit) we are now seeing useful case studies emerging. As many of these frameworks are based on constructive alignment models, the inclusion of authentic learning opportunities can be easily incorporated into the curriculum (especially into the professional curriculum that has a work place element to the learning programme). Much of the research in this area recommend this approach (and stresses a move away from generic ICT models like the ECDL). Incorporating these tools and practices into the curriculum acknowledge the importance of digital lteracies as generic transferable comptencies (graduate attributes) to institutions, academics and students. It has to be engineered - it won't happen by osmosis. Digital literacies and identify can be closely associated with students' construction of a lifelong learning digital footprint (or portfolio) which facilitates the aggregation of digital artefacts, processes and outputs alongside opportunities to reflect on student's personal, academic and professional journey. This portfolio can be exposed and targeted at a ranges of stakeholder audiences (including prospective employers). [Editor's Note: Fantastic points! We have covered digital literacy indepth in past reports and will be adding this to the Challenges discussion.]

    Experience API
    I'm not sure if this isn't dealt with already but Experience API (aka, or originally, Tin Can) is a new software specification that takes up where SCORM leaves off and allows, inter alia, for recording and tracking of all kinds of learning experience and evidence within, and tellingly, beyond the traditional LMS type environment. It's right here right now but not everyone is aware of it (and fewer of us are actually using it yet): AgreedAlison.Egan Feb 16, 2015 [Editor's Note: Thanks for sharing! We do not feature products as technology topics in the Horizon Project.]
    Virtualisation
    I'm not sure if this is a topic in its own right, or connected to topics such as BYOD and/or single sign on. For many if not all disciplines, the ability of students to access specialist/discipline-specific software from their own laptop has to be a central plank of HEI digital strategy. BYOD needs to be a 'negotiated' approach, where colleges can advise students about the most appropriate devices to own, relevant to their particular programme of study. jimdevine Feb 10, 2015 deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Description, rationale and discussion.... Virtualisation and Cloud go together: Cloud Computing is already a topic? Phelim.Murnion Feb 18, 2015 The use of virtualisation as infrastructure and also potentially as a teaching methodology, particularly in STEM education. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    [Editor's Note: Great Points!]

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  4. page Challenges edited ... Add your ideas here, with few sentences of description including full URLs for references (e.g…
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    Add your ideas here, with few sentences of description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
    Balancing our Connected and Unconnected LivesWith the abundance of content, technologies, and overall participatory options, learning institutions need to lead the way to facilitating finding a balance between connected and unconnected life. With technology now at the center of many daily activities, it is important that learners understand how to balance their connected life with other developmental needs. Educational institutions should lead the way to ensure learners do not get lost and absorbed by the abundance of information and technology, and encourage mindful use of technology so that students stay aware of their digital footprint. As education aligns closer with technological trends, teachers will have to promote this balance, encouraging students to feel, digest, reflect, touch, and pursue sensorial experiences that are crucial to developing character and integrity. Finding a balance and guiding learners to personal success should be society's compromise with new generations of digital natives. The merging of these two 'lives' as they are so frequently referred to needs closer examination in an age that sees suicide on the increase when at the same time it is reported that we were never so connected. The nature of this connection is fragile and transient. [Grace O'Learyg.oleary Feb 11, 2015] .deirdre.butler Feb 15, 2015 lwidger Feb 22, 2015
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    Feb 15, 2015I2015 I agree with
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    Feb 22, 2015Agree2015 Agree with this
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    Feb 16, 2015ken.brown2015 ken.brown Jan 24,
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    Feb 15, 2015What2015 What might make
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    Feb 22, 2015Innovation2015 Innovation within MOOCs
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    Feb 19, 2015Learning2015 Learning design approaches
    Expanding AccessThe global drive to increase the number of students participating in undergraduate education is placing pressure across the system. The oft-cited relationship between earning potential and educational attainment plus the clear impact of an educated society on the growth of the middle class is pushing governments to encourage more and more students to enter universities and colleges. In many countries, however, the population of students prepared for undergraduate study is already enrolled — expanding access means extending it to students who may not have the academic background to be successful without additional support. Many in universities feel that these institutions do not have sufficient time and resources to help this set of students. ken.brown Feb 14, 2015 The desire to expand access to students from less academic backgrounds must be matched by a new adaptive model for access, support and participation.
    Keeping Formal Education RelevantMany pundits worry that if education does not adapt to the times, other models of learning (especially other business models) will take its place. While this concern has some merits, it is unlikely that schools as we know them will go away. As online learning and free educational content become more pervasive, institutional stakeholders must address the question of what school can provide that other approaches cannot, and rethink the value of education from a student's perspective. deirdre.butler Feb 15, 2015
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    approach to teachingTheteaching The lack of
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    Feb 15, 2015This2015 This issue is
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    Feb 14, 2015.I'm2015. I'm not aware
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    Feb 15, 2015Technology2015
    Technology
    Use by
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    Oldham, E. (2013)Teacher(2013) Teacher Identified Uses
    Managing Knowledge ObsolescenceSimply staying organized and current presents a challenge in a world where information, software tools, and devices proliferate at the rate they do today. New developments in technology are exciting and their potential for improving quality of life is enticing, but it can be overwhelming to attempt to keep up with even a few of the many new tools that are released. User-created content is exploding, giving rise to information, ideas, and opinions on all sorts of interesting topics, but following even some of the hundreds of available authorities means sifting through a mountain of information on a weekly or daily basis. There is a greater need than ever for effective tools and filters for finding, interpreting, organizing, and retrieving the data that is important to us.
    Personalising LearningThe demand for personalized learning is not adequately supported by current technology or practices. The increasing demand for education that is customized to each student's unique needs is driving the development of new technologies that provide more learner choice and control and allow for differentiated instruction. It has become clear that one-size-fits-all teaching methods are neither effective nor acceptable for today's diverse students. Technology can and should support individual choices about access to materials and expertise, amount and type of educational content, and methods of teaching. The biggest barrier to personalized learning, however, is that scientific, data-driven approaches to effectively facilitate personalization have only recently begun to emerge; learning analytics, for example, is still evolving and gaining traction within higher education. ken.brown Feb 14, 2015There are limits in the degree to which personalisation can be accommodated and provision remain sustainable. Semantics are important here. Personalisation can be accounted for in the pedgagogies and practicies that respect the diverse learning styles and some choices. But professional thresholds and assessment require robust, standard and accredited thresholds that are absolute and not personisaled. Indeed some professional bodies will dictate terms and conditions of assessment, contact and professional experience in return for accreditation. This is a highly complex area as a result. The degree of freedom to permit personisation often depends on the educational output. Award bearing ones will be more restrictive than say MOOC-type badging.b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015
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    more adjunct professors.Thisprofessors. This is a
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    15, 2015
    Hiring
    Hiring and retaining
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    technology staff;
    Optimizing
    Optimizing the use
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    BYOD environments
    roisin.donnelly
    roisin.donnelly Feb 16,
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    often discourages experimentation.Agreed.experimentation. Agreed. Even where
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    Feb 15, 2015A2015 A broader question
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    Feb 10, 2015This2015 This also relates
    Teaching Complex ThinkingWe live in a world where in order to be successful, one needs to be capable not only of complex, expert thinking, but also adept at communicating complex information in accessible, understandable ways. Today’s young people live in a world that is interconnected in myriad ways, and they begin to engage with social media and networks at a very early age. Institutions have the responsibility of informing learners of how to understand relationships and make decisions in that interconnected world. The semantic web, big data, modelling technologies, and other innovations are creating the experimental conditions that have the potential to train learners in complex and systems thinking to create meaningful learning experiences. I fully agree that complex thinking and communication are vital for the global connected world we live in. However although our 3rd level students use social media non-stop, what continues to shock me year on year is their lack of understanding about privacy and ethical issues. Their levels of digital literacy continue to be very low and although they use digital technologies to connect socially I see very little evidence of it being used for learning collaboratively either formally or informally, Students are generally immature in their understandings which hinders our use of the technology at third level. Hopefully the new digital strategy for schools which is due to be launched soon will help solve this problem. deirdre.butler Feb 15, 2015
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    Agreed, while students
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    by IPTS:
    http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=6359
    http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=6359 jimdevine Feb
    Added as New Challenges to RQ4
    Change and Innovation ManagementI would fold the two previous items (Scaling ... / Leadership ...) into this. The greatest challenge is to rethink our entire management/organisational structures for technology supported innovation. From the basics of class timetabling to the strategic issues of inter-organisational collaboration, existing decision making processes are entirely unsuited to the new context of TEL. Without organisational/process change the new technologies will not have an impact. Existing research in the for profit sector has established a complete consensus: experimenting with technology is one thing but to achieve systemic change with technology the main barriers are organisational and systemic, not technological. Phelim.Murnion Feb 18, 2015Agree. Gerry.Gallagher Feb 22, 2015 agree lwidger Feb 22, 2015 Flexible Learning in inflexible institutions - This challenge is touched on in several of the entries in this section and extends earlier comments (Change Management/Innovation Management, Incentivising or Forcing Change in Higher Ed. institutions, 'Leadership for Scale and Impact') and was raised in several presentations during the EdTech conference held in May 2014 in UCD. The government have expressed a strategic goal of increasing the level of flexible learning, both in mode of study, associated development and delivery of the curriculum to take advantage of the affordances and flexibility of technology enhanced learning (Hunt report, etc) . Some lecturers and students are striving to maintain and increase the level of creativity and associated exploration of learning technology within a physically stagnant learning, working and programme development environment. A lack of flexibility and change within the learning institutions in terms of adapting programme structures, evolving the learning environment (and associated support infrastructure), changing work practices to facilitate a blended mode of delivery, is stifling this innovation and the associated development of flexible learning pathways. lwidger Feb 22, 2015 Incentivising or Forcing Change in Higher Ed. institutions - as long as institutions are not allowed to "fail" there does not seem to be much incentivisation for academics to agree to changes. This is linked to the Agility issue. Universities seem to be designed for slow change through the collegiate approach to decision taking. This seems unsuitable in a time of rapid technological opportunities. In addition, when this collegiate approach was first developed, universities were in competition with each other and could fail. For political reasons, even that imperative seems to have disappeared (particularly in Europe). brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Agile Approaches to Change- There is a growing consensus among many higher education thought leaders that institutional leadership and curricula could benefit from agile startup models. Educators are working to develop new approaches and programs based on these models that stimulate top-down change and can be implemented across a broad range of institutional settings. The Lean Startup movement uses technology as a catalyst for promoting a culture of innovation in a more widespread, cost-effective manner. Pilots and other experimental programs are being developed for teaching and improving organizational structure to more effectively nurture entrepreneurship among both students and faculty.
    Larry.McNutt Feb 15, 2015 We are the greatest challenge! - and need to continue to adopt a reflexive practice ! to quote from something I wrote earlier....
    Engaging with the Ethical, Privacy and Ideological Aspects of Learning Analytics This a is a highly charged area and it would be naive to assume that the benign intentions of educators will automatically translate into quality, well-regulated and understood analytics implementations. A significant discussion will be needed to map the legal, data protection, ethical, privacy and other issues. An we should not start from the assumption that because we can do it (analytics) it is necessarily a good or desirable thing. After all, part of the learning for students is to be able to make mistakes, do silly things, fail etc., and it is important that these aspects of learning occur in a safe and supportive environment and without any risk arising from a digital footprint one would rather forget. See, for example, Paul Prinsloo 'A brave new world: student surveillance in higher education.
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    Learning Analytics
    http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/5657/1/Learning_analytics_report.pdf
    http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/5657/1/Learning_analytics_report.pdf jimdevine Feb
    Prioritizing Technology Over Learning
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    19, 2015 Adopting Buzz Words Without Understanding Them- The frequent use and mis-use of terms, such as 'Communities of practice' and 'affordances' to mention but a few, can often lead to poor designs that don't have the expected results. Insufficient conceptual and methodological tools can also impede the analysis and evaluation of the systems that are put in place and can lead to ill-informed decisions or policies. francoise.blin Feb 14, 2015 Agree deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree...we need to ensure a shared understanding rosemary.cooper Feb 15, 2015 Agree entirely - would argue that we'd need to include 'Digital Natives' on this list too - a hugely problematic term that continues to be used (or misused!) enda.donlon Feb 15, 2015 I would also look at 'ipads' and 3d printing - we must have them but my first question to colleagues is always - tell me what you're going to do with them first and how, rather than just 'have them' - awareness of technological pedagogy, rather than just kit for kit's sakeAlison.Egan Feb 16, 2015
    I agree, but it goes further than using terms without understanding them! What's worse is understanding the term and somehow believing we're doing it, when in fact we're not! (Argyris, espoused theories versus theories in action). At the heart of this is being really able to align learning outcomes with T/L strategies and with appropriate assessment. jimdevine Feb 15, 2015
    Something that doesn't quite fit into the Horizon approach is the question: "what should we stop doing". jimdevine Feb 15, 2015

    Other Key Points and Links
    Larry.McNuttAdopting Buzz Words Without Understanding Them-
    The frequent use and mis-use of terms, such as 'Communities of practice' and 'affordances' to mention but a few, can often lead to poor designs that don't have the expected results. Insufficient conceptual and methodological tools can also impede the analysis and evaluation of the systems that are put in place and can lead to ill-informed decisions or policies. francoise.blin Feb 14, 2015 Agree deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree...we need to ensure a shared understanding rosemary.cooper Feb 15, 2015 Agree entirely - would argue that we'd need to include 'Digital Natives' on this list too - a hugely problematic term that continues to be used (or misused!) enda.donlon Feb 15, 2015 I would also look at 'ipads' and 3d printing - we must have them but my first question to colleagues is always - tell me what you're going to do with them first and how, rather than just 'have them' - awareness of technological pedagogy, rather than just kit for kit's sakeAlison.Egan Feb 16, 2015 I agree, but it goes further than using terms without understanding them! What's worse is understanding the term and somehow believing we're doing it, when in fact we're not! (Argyris, espoused theories versus theories in action). At the heart of this is being really able to align learning outcomes with T/L strategies and with appropriate assessment. jimdevine Feb 15, 2015 Something that doesn't quite fit into the Horizon approach is the question: "what should we stop doing". jimdevine Feb 15, 2015 Larry.McNutt
    Feb 15,
    "The agent engaged in practice knows the world…too well, without objectifying distance, take it for granted, precisely because he is caught up in it, bound up with it; he inhabits it like a garment…he feels at home in the world because the world is also in him, in the form of the habitus” (Bourdieu, 2000: p. 142-143)
    A reflexive practice that’s exceeds the bounds of a purely technocentric discourse would allow educational technologists an opportunity to voice their views and beliefs in relation to the challenges facing higher education. The need to assert a greater influence on current policies and practices in the wider domain is of paramount importance. Rather than educational technology being viewed as simply an economically more advantageous means of “delivering” education – a commodity exchange model endorsed by current neo-liberal policies.
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    Trend Name.
    Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
    Digital DeliveryLearning is Increasingly the NormDigitalNorm [Ed: previously digital delivery]Digital delivery will
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    23, 2015 [Editor's note -- great suggestion! topic name changed.]
    Evolution of Online LearningOver the past several years, there has been a shift in the perception of online learning to the point where it is seen as a viable alternative to some forms of face-to-face learning. The value that online learning offers is now well understood, with flexibility, ease of access, and the integration of sophisticated multimedia and technologies chief among the list of appeals. Recent developments in business models are upping the ante of innovation in these digital environments, which are now widely considered to be ripe for new ideas, services, and products. While growing steadily, this trend is still a number of years away from its maximum impact. Progress in learning analytics, adaptive learning, and a combination of cutting-edge asynchronous and synchronous tools will continue to advance the state of online learning and keep it compelling, though many of these are still the subjects of experiments and research by online learning providers and tertiary institutions. The statements could be augmented by identifying online learning as maturing and potentially becoming a preferred mode of delivery for particular aspects of HE, including CPD for graduates and for certain postgraduate taught programmes. jimdevine Feb 10, 2015 Great points! Sam Feb 13, 2015 Agree and particular programmes are more suited than others to an online environment. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree and would add particular flexibility offered by online learning for part-time students. NSweeney Feb 19, 2015 Online learning and the learning platform will be the core of all future digital learning developments with new tools, services and educational technologies being bolted on, and new functionality and innovation appearing as a result. There are many parallels with the smart phone market with operating systems, bolt-on tools, services and personalisation. b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015rnidhubhda Feb 12, 2015 http://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidence-based-practices/finalreport.pdf Like everything, market forces can be very influential and when the customer demands "it" (aka - quality online learning) we will evolve. I believe that there will be /has been some early adopters in the field of online learning but it will become more common place. With more than one in ten post primary schools being a "tablet school" in Ireland our students in the (very near) future will not accept lessons on white boards delivered by a sage on the stage. This will become particularly evident as the cost of fees have more of an influence on a students course/institution choice. mark.glynn Feb 23, 2015
    Growing Focus on Measuring LearningThere is a growing interest in using new sources of data for personalizing the learning experience and for performance measurement. As learners participate in online activities, they leave an increasingly clear trail of analytics data that can be mined for insights. Learning analytics experiments and demonstration projects are currently examining ways to use that data to modify learning strategies and processes. Dashboards filter this information so that student progress can be monitored in real time. As the field of learning analytics matures, the hope is that this information will enable continual improvement of learning outcomes.I think there is huge potential here, placing aside issues of data protection. Firstly, users of the data need to identify what they need to know so there is a piece of work to do to scope requirements and metrics, etc. as with any information system. Very interesting space. rosemary.cooper Feb 15, 2015 Agree, fascinating topic that will be of great interest as it develops and unfolds. enda.donlon Feb 22, 2015This is a long term trend. The traditional way of assessing students with artificially constructed point-in-time is completely outdated and does not fit with the changing student population or the rapidly changes in educational toolkit and content. Phelim.Murnion Feb 18, 2015Closely tied to learners as creators and rethinking the role of the teacher. Innovations in technology-mediated assessment are fundamental to enhancing learning: to promote creativity, collaboration, digital literacy and entrepreneurship. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015 This whole topic is a "+1" for me mark.glynn Feb 23, 2015
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    Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
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    other rich media.Imedia. I would suggest
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    Feb 15, 2015I2015 I do, however,
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    and tertiary institutions.Theinstitutions. The statements could
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    2015 http://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidence-based-practices/finalreport.pdf
    Like
    Like everything, market
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    Feb 21, 2015This2015 This whole topic
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    every education sector.Ansector. An area external
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    Feb 14, 2015Developments2015 Developments such as
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    eamon.costello
    eamon.costello Feb 18,
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    do in class.Theclass. The BYOD debate
    Increasing Use of Hybrid Learning Designs Education paradigms are shifting to include more online learning, blended, and hybrid learning, and collaborative models. Students already spend much of their free time on the Internet, learning and exchanging new information. Institutions that embrace face-to-face, online, and hybrid learning models have the potential to leverage the online skills learners have already developed independent of academia. Online learning environments can offer different affordances than physical campuses, including opportunities for increased collaboration while equipping students with stronger digital skills. Hybrid models, when designed and implemented successfully, enable students to travel to campus for some activities, while using the network for others, taking advantage of the best of both environments. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree NSweeney Feb 19, 2015 A conceptually informed, situated design approach would seem very important (diSessa & Cobb, 2004), to help ensure new hybrid learning designs and models work most effectively for learners and enhance significantly their higher education experience. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    Massive Reinvention of the Personal Computer Computers as we know them are in the process of a massive reinvention. The computer is smaller, lighter, and better connected than ever before, without the need for wires or bulky peripherals. In many cases, smartphones and other mobile devices are sufficient for basic computing needs, and only specialized tasks require a keyboard, large monitor, and a mouse. Mobiles are connected to an ecosystem of applications supported by cloud computing technologies that can be downloaded and used instantly, for pennies. As the capabilities and interfaces of small computing devices improve, our ideas about when — or whether — a traditional computer is necessary are changing as well.
    New Forms of Multidisciplinary Research Digital humanities and computational social science research approaches are opening up new pioneering areas of multidisciplinary research, innovative forms of scholarship and publication, and new kinds of courses and pedagogies. Researchers, along with academic technologists and developers, are breaking new ground with data structures, visualization, geospatial applications, and innovative uses of open source tools. At the same time, they are pioneering new forms of scholarly publication that combine traditional static print style scholarship with dynamic and interactive tools, which enables real-time manipulation of research data. Applying quantitative methods to traditionally qualitative disciplines has led to new research categories such as Distant Reading and Macroanalysis — the study of large corpuses of texts as opposed to close reading of a few texts. These emerging areas are leading to exciting new courses and curricula for undergraduate and graduate students
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    Feb 15, 2015The2015 The National Forum
    Shift from Students as Consumers to Students as CreatorsA shift is taking place in the focus of pedagogical practice on university campuses all over the world as students in across a wide variety of disciplines are learning by making and creating rather than from the simple consumption of content. Creativity, as illustrated by the growth of user-generated videos, maker communities, and crowdfunded projects in the past couple years, is increasingly the means for active, hands-on learning. University departments in areas that have not traditionally had lab or hands-on components are shifting to incorporate hands-on learning experiences as an integral part of the curriculum. Courses and degree plans across all disciplines at institutions are in the process of changing to reflect the importance of media creation, design, and entrepreneurship.I am not sure who wrote the above, but this shift from students as consumers to students as content creators is fundamental and can only increase. It calls for the inclusion of digital literacies and multimodality on the curriculum throughout the educational sector. francoise.blin Feb 14, 2015 I agree rosemary.cooper Feb 15, 2015 I agree also; students as creators offers enhanced opportunities for exploration, expression, problem solving and potentially deeper learning. Alongside this, the development of supporting and enabling digital literacies needs to be addressed at all levels of our educational sector.NSweeney Feb 19, 2015 I couldn't agree more. It is amazing to see the transformation in the confidence and professional identity of trainee teachers and adult educators when they learn how to incorporate a YouTube clip into an online lesson plan (by copying code into a blog full of lesson plans) or using a free screencast application to produce a short 'welcome' video for their own students (complete with audio narration over a series of PowerPoints or a process walkthrough). paul.gormley Feb 22, 2015
    Added to RQ 3 as New Trends
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    Combined with Existing RQ1 Important Developments in Ed Tech
    Digital Certification- if institutions move toward the issuing of digital certificates (like Mozilla badges) much mode data can be associated with the certificates and they can be more reliably authenticated. this will both help employers to evaluate candidates and organisations to evaluate prior learning (both relevance and quantity) more easily and so facilitate moving between institutions. brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 enda.donlon Feb 22, 2015 [Editor: Great point! Adding this to the existing RQ1 Important Development in Ed Tech topic: "Badges/Microcredit"]
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    15, 2015
    rnidhubhda
    rnidhubhda Feb 12,
    Other Key Points and Relevant Links
    EDUCAUSE presents the top-ten IT issues facing higher education institutions. Many of these issues are not new. But in 2014 the ideas, solutions, and models that have been accumulating in higher education and technology will hit IT organizations—and the institutions they serve—fast and hard. This is the year that the front part of the herd will join the mavericks, tipping the balance for the rest.
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  7. page New Topic edited ... Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as…
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    Animation is a communication medium and is an ideal tool for language teaching and learning as it facilitates the integration of all four skills of language learning: reading, writing, speaking and listening; creating a more authentic meaningful language-learning environment for students. There are many animation applications (web and mobile) available to language teachers such as Go Animate, PowToons, Scratch, Puppet Pals, etc. rnidhubhda Feb 12, 2015 We use animation and coding software with our students across a range of programmes at undergrad and postgrad in order that they can in turn design creative learning environments for their students at first and second level. deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015 Agree this is an area that offers opportunity to expand a number of literacy types (language, visual, digital amongst them), and can encourage creative collaboration and expression at all levels of education.NSweeney Feb 15, 2015 Creative, constructionist apps and software that enable learners to design, develop, adapt and, or share multimedia artefacts and products. tony.hall Feb 21, 2015
    Combined with Existing Topics in RQ1
    Digital Literacies
    paul.gormley Feb 22, 2015 This suggestion is closely related to the topic 'Digital Identity' Digital identity in higher education is very much related to digital literacy of both students and teachers. For example, Barnett and Coate (2005) suggest being digital in the C21 higher education context is influenced by knowledge, skills/actions and being (i.e. a sense of 'self' which manifests itself in one's digital identity). In other words the definition of digital identity above does not explicitly capture captures the ability of the person to apply digital knowledge, skills, tools and attributes (although this may be covered by the 'ontological taxonomy' wording) Learning design approaches need to embed contextualised digital literacies into the curriculum. At present, there is a lot of noise about digital literacies with few practical examples of how these can be operationalised. However, with the emergence of digital literacy frameworks (e.g. Open University, JISC/Beetham, DigEULit) we are now seeing useful case studies emerging. As many of these frameworks are based on constructive alignment models, the inclusion of authentic learning opportunities can be easily incorporated into the curriculum (especially into the professional curriculum that has a work place element to the learning programme). Much of the research in this area recommend this approach (and stresses a move away from generic ICT models like the ECDL). Incorporating these tools and practices into the curriculum acknowledge the importance of digital lteracies as generic transferable comptencies (graduate attributes) to institutions, academics and students. It has to be engineered - it won't happen by osmosis. Digital literacies and identify can be closely associated with students' construction of a lifelong learning digital footprint (or portfolio) which facilitates the aggregation of digital artefacts, processes and outputs alongside opportunities to reflect on student's personal, academic and professional journey. This portfolio can be exposed and targeted at a ranges of stakeholder audiences (including prospective employers). [Editor's Note: Fantastic points! We will merge this with the existing definition in RQ1 for Digital Identity]
    [Editor's note -- let's have an editor's meeting on this topic -- literacy and identity may be related, but they are also very distinct topics]
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    As verifiable alternative credentials that employers can drill into to see more detail, they could attract learners away from higher educational institutions. They may be valuable to higher educational institutions by (i) allowing students to show more detail of their academic achievements, (ii) facilitate a move towards competency or mastery learning, (iii) facilitate the construction of shared infrastructure for easing recognition of prior learning (RPL/APL). brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Agree - badges have become one of the monetisation strategies of MOOCs; mainstream HE can learn and adapt the concept for flexible frameworks such as CPD. b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015 ken.brown Feb 14, 2015 agree the utilisation of accredited badges But aren't badges and microcredits one of the current list of topics already (I think this is a list for what might need to be added) Gearoid.OSuilleabhain Feb 15, 2015 Gearóid is correct - this is already listed brian.mulligan Feb 17, 2015 [Editor's Note: This topic already exists in RQ1 under Badges/Micro-credits and your comments will be added there.]
    Virtualisation
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    14, 2015
    Description,
    Description, rationale and
    Other Interesting Points
    Experience API
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  8. page New Topic edited ... Platforms that allow subject matter experts to drop in learning and assessment assessment obje…
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    Platforms that allow subject matter experts to drop in learning and assessment assessment objects without the need for expertise in adaptive design or construction, and can then modify individual learning challenges by adapting to activity and progress brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Yes! The 2015 NMC Horizon Report for Higher Ed identified Adaptive Learning Technologies. We aim to make this topic a Horizon Project staple now. Sam Feb 13, 2015 Agree - the more the technology can do on behalf of the expert the better; relieves pressure on training and development.b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015 totally agree deirdre.butler Feb 14, 2015agreedAlison.Egan Feb 16, 2015 [Editor's Note: We agree. This topic will be renamed Adaptive Learning Technologies and will be added to the voting system]
    Cross-Platform Integration Tools
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    In
    In addition to
    Digital Animation and Coding
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    Creative,
    Creative, constructionist apps
    Combined with Existing Topics in RQ1
    Digital Literacies paul.gormley
    paul.gormley
    Feb 22, 2015
    This
    This suggestion is
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    'Digital Identity'
    Digital
    Digital identity in
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    taxonomy' wording)
    Learning
    Learning design approaches
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    happen by osmosis.Digitalosmosis. Digital literacies and
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    Digital Identity]
    [Editor's note -- let's have an editor's meeting on this topic -- literacy and identity may be related, but they are also very distinct topics]

    Learning Badges - Mozilla.
    As verifiable alternative credentials that employers can drill into to see more detail, they could attract learners away from higher educational institutions. They may be valuable to higher educational institutions by (i) allowing students to show more detail of their academic achievements, (ii) facilitate a move towards competency or mastery learning, (iii) facilitate the construction of shared infrastructure for easing recognition of prior learning (RPL/APL). brian.mulligan Feb 11, 2015 Agree - badges have become one of the monetisation strategies of MOOCs; mainstream HE can learn and adapt the concept for flexible frameworks such as CPD. b.murphy1 Feb 14, 2015 ken.brown Feb 14, 2015 agree the utilisation of accredited badges But aren't badges and microcredits one of the current list of topics already (I think this is a list for what might need to be added) Gearoid.OSuilleabhain Feb 15, 2015 Gearóid is correct - this is already listed brian.mulligan Feb 17, 2015 [Editor's Note: This topic already exists in RQ1 under Badges/Micro-credits and your comments will be added there.]
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    8:15 am

Tuesday, February 24

  1. page Timeline edited ... Panel answers the Research Questions February 24 - March 8, 2015 Panel completings complet…
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    Panel answers the Research Questions
    February 24 - March 8, 2015
    Panel completingscompletes Rankings
    March 9 - May 1, 2015
    NMC Staff writes report
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    2:35 pm
  2. page Timeline edited ... Panel answers the Research Questions February 24 - March 8, 2015 Panel makes first pass at …
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    Panel answers the Research Questions
    February 24 - March 8, 2015
    Panel makes first pass atcompletings Rankings
    March 9 - May 1, 2015
    NMC Staff writes report
    (view changes)
    2:35 pm

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